1 Tim 3:2 A bishop then must be blameless, the husband of one wife, vigilant, sober, of good behaviour, given to hospitality, apt to teach;

1 Tim 3:3 Not given to wine, no striker, not greedy of filthy lucre; but patient, not a brawler, not covetous;

1 Tim 3:4 One that ruleth well his own house, having his children in subjection with all gravity;

For if a man can not rule his own house, how can he rule anything much more with the church of god.
1 Tim 3:5 (For if a man know not how to rule his own house, how shall he take care of the church of God?)

1 Tim 3:12 Let the deacons be the husbands of one wife, ruling their children and their own houses well.
It is unchristian to say that you love your Children but divorced their mother.
1 John 5:1 Whosoever believeth that Jesus is the Christ is born of God: and every one that loveth him that begat loveth him also that is begotten of him.

Related Post: Cheating Wife!


Forget Me Not

"Beauty is in the eye of the Beholder". This saying first appeared in the 3rd century BC in Greek. It didn't appear in its current form in print until the 19th century, but in the meantime there were various written forms that expressed much the same thought. In 1588, the English dramatist John Lyly, in his Euphues and his England, wrote:
"...as neere is Fancie to Beautie, as the pricke to the Rose, as the stalke to the rynde, as the earth to the roote."
Shakespeare expressed a similar sentiment in Love's Labours Lost, 1588:
Good Lord Boyet, my beauty, though but mean,
Needs not the painted flourish of your praise:
Beauty is bought by judgement of the eye,
Not utter'd by base sale of chapmen's tongues
Benjamin Franklin, in Poor Richard's Almanack, 1741, wrote:
Beauty, like supreme dominion
Is but supported by opinion
David Hume's Essays, Moral and Political, 1742, include:
"Beauty in things exists merely in the mind which contemplates them."
The person who is widely credited with coining the saying in its current form is Margaret Wolfe Hungerford (née Hamilton), who wrote many books, often under the pseudonym of 'The Duchess'. In Molly Bawn, 1878, there's the line "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder", which is the earliest citation of it that we can find in print.
But beauty is not eternal and deteriorates as we grow older. And who can record and remember all things of the past?
Is 49:15 Can a woman forget her sucking child, that she should not have compassion on the son of her womb? yes, they may forget, yet I will not forget thee.
It pays to be beautiful outside but to be beautiful inside is eternal in this life and in the life to come that is, after death.
Heb 6:10 For God is not unrighteous to forget your work and labor of love, which ye have shown towards his name, in that ye have ministered to the saints, and do minister.

No comments:

Post a Comment